Tag Archive: buy a house



View is the one of the major factors that affects the resale value when buying homes. Buying homes with a pleasant view of a beach or the horizon often sell at a premium above similar homes without the view.

Though you may place a considerable dollar value on the view, future buyers may not be so like-minded. It may take you longer to find a buyer when it comes time to resell the house. Or you may end up dropping your price to more nearly match other sales prices in the neighborhood.

In short, if you are buying a house with a view, try to pay as little extra as possible. Otherwise, you might not get your money back.

Most real homes today are usually concentrated on the building itself but the lot is important too. Home with a good resale value should have lots that are as level as possible.

Assuming the property is in a typical neighborhood, the lot should be rectangular – no odd shaped lots or oddly situated lots.

Courtyard sizes are smaller in modern homes than in older homes, but there should still be a decently sized front and back yard.

Do not buy an over-landscaped property, either. You would normally pay a premium for that, which you may not be able to recover when you sell. You will get your best value if the house is moderately landscaped or under-landscaped for the area.

You can always perk up the landscaping during your ownership by humanizing the grass and adding bushes and trees. Just do not waste too much.

In each residential neighborhood, houses will vary in size and rooms, but they should not be too different. If resale value is an important consideration, you should not buy the largest model in the neighborhood.

When determining market value, the homes nearest to yours are most important. If most of the nearby houses are smaller than your house, they can act as a drag on appreciation.

On the other hand, if you buy a small or medium house for the neighborhood, the larger homes can help pull up your value. This is one of those times where determining your “wants” versus your “needs” can be extremely important.

Buying what you need in a more prestigious neighborhood may provide more financial reward than getting what you want in a less desirable neighborhood.

Three and four bedroom houses are the most popular among homebuyers, so if you can stick in that range you will have more potential buyers when it comes time to resell.

There ought to always be at least two bathrooms in a house, preferably at least two and a half. One bathroom with a place to wash up for day-to-day visitors, one for the master bedroom, and at least one to be shared by the other bedrooms.

Walk-in closets are extremely desirable for the master bedroom. For the rest of the house, just be sure there is ample closet space. Don’t disregard space for linens and towels.

Garages add to the resale value and you should always make sure to get at least a two-car garage. Lately, three-car garages have become desirable in some areas of the country.

The laundry facilities should be located somewhere convenient on the main floor of the house, but not in a place it will create an eyesore. Think about whether you want to walk up and down stairs when carrying loads of laundry.

Family activity centers on the kitchen, so this is the most important room of the house. Larger kitchens are better, and they should be provided with modern appliances.

Obviously, the dining room and breakfast nook should be located adjacent to the kitchen. In newer houses, the family room should also be extremely close to the kitchen.

There should be easy access to the back yard, as there will be occasions for barbecues and outdoor entertaining.

In addition, it should be a short trek between the garage to the kitchen so hauling groceries in from the car does not become a horrendous chore.

Swimming pools do not provide as much added value as they once did. Safety issues about families with younger children have become more publicized than in the past, so families with small children tend to avoid homes with pools.

As a result, having a pool may actually reduce the number of potential homebuyers when you try to resell the home.

Foreclosed Home

Foreclosed houses are undoubtedly the choice homes for many people who are seriously considering buying anew house, a second home, or an investment property. But a big part of ensuring that your investment is well-protected is in making sure that you are adequately aware of the condition and state of the property you are going to buy before you make the decision to purchase it.

While buyers know that they should get a home inspection done on their houses, not everybody is aware of how it is done and what it is all about. In fact, very few buyers can even interpret or read a home inspection report. But regardless of this fact, every buyer must still have home inspections done on the properties that they are willing to buy.

The Truth about Home Inspections

When you are viewing a property, but would like to have a professional inspection report deliver to you, your agent will most likely give you a list of home inspectors that you can tap to accomplish the work. However, you must be aware that not all home inspectors do the same thing. A general home inspector could give you a rundown of the general state of the house as well as its overall condition, but may not be able to give you any report on specific things that need to be looked at in the property.

This is because there are several types of home inspections done on foreclosed houses. Basically, general inspectors could give you a good idea of the defects and repairs that are apparent from the general condition of the house, but may need to refer you to other inspectors who are more qualified to look into specialized concerns like pest control, asbestos check and others.

Pest control inspectors can give you a report on the presence or possibility of pest infestation on the property. If you are buying a foreclosed home that is built entirely with wood, you may want to consider getting this type of inspector to check the integrity of the wood material with respect to termites and other wood eating pests.

If the foreclosed houses have chimneys, there are chimney inspectors that can determine whether the chimney could still contain and discharge smoke properly as well as see if the structure is not in a deteriorating state.

While a general inspector can note the general electrical concerns of the house, an electrician is still the best person to ask to ascertain the electrical connections, wiring and other possible problems that may arise with respect to electricity.

Finally, you should try to get a good and reputable foundation engineer who can point out important concerns regarding the integrity of the foundation of the foreclosed houses you are considering as this also has great implications on your safety and those of the potential dwellers.

Buying repo homes for sales have become a common exercise for a lot of investors. Even first time home buyers have completed purchases of these properties to their satisfaction. While there may be some risks involved, these are overtaken by the benefits to be reaped and this is the reason why more and more people are getting on the bandwagon and finding their own home to buy.

Most of the risks involved in buying repo homes for sales are brought about by acting on poor data. Getting the wrong information can set you back financially. It is a good thing that there is adequate knowledge about the foreclosures sector to enlighten new buyers. One should try to learn the workings of foreclosure investing first before they even look for a property to purchase.

Foreclosure Basics

Foreclosure is a legal action taken by lenders to recover losses due to non-payment of the loan they provided for a borrower used for purchasing a property. Once the foreclosure proceeding is initiated the home is scheduled for a public auction where it is offered at a value that represents the unpaid portion of the loan. If the home does not sell at an auction it becomes the property of the lender where it will again be offered to the market in roughly the same amount.

Repo homes for sales also get sold at the pre-foreclosure period. Also called short sales, these types of transactions take place when the owner themselves seeks the approval of their lender to sell the home for a price that is lower than what they still owe. Lenders usually go for this type of sale because it relieves them of the costly foreclosure proceeding. It is likewise favorable to the home owner who gets to keep their credit rating which can be decimated by a recorded foreclosure.

Internet Homebuyers

You’ve tried to avoid it for years…a real estate agent website.  You figured word-of-mouth, newspaper, flyers and signage would cover your advertising for years to come. Well, if you haven’t crawled out from under your rock already, it’s 2010. We live in a digital world…where Facebook and BlackBerry addictions have supreme reign. Where blogging, texting and e-mails are our communication lines of choice. People use the Internet now to buy their groceries, rent a movie and order their favourite Chinese take-out. If your real estate business has yet to embrace the online age, where does that leave you? Probably miles behind your competition. So isn’t it time you capitalized on the Internet revolution?

Start by understanding that more and more people are relying on the web to learn about the entire real estate process. There has also been a shift in consumer from Generation X to Generation Y. First-time buyers from GenY will have different communication needs, purchasing behaviour and housing requirements than their earlier counterparts. Now more than ever, it’s vital for all real estate professionals to understand why the Internet is so crucial to today’s industry, and why choosing not to get involved would reduce their profits and competitive edge.

As today’s potential client has less time than ever before, they desire their information served on a silver platter. So why not deliver the information they want and make it available to them 24 hours a day? Give them a one-stop-online-real-estate-shop to help them buy their dream home? That’s what they’re looking for. Nowadays, they expect it.

So why are customers so apt to house-hunting online?

1.  Well first, it saves them time, and plenty of it. Who has the energy to flip through a mile-high pile of messy newspapers? Or make 20 preview appointments with a REALTOR®? Certainly not the urban jet-setters, soccer moms or suits of today’s world.

These Internet savvy buyers will take an average of 4.5 weeks to look for information on homes and neighborhoods before ever contacting a real estate professional, as compared to a traditional buyer that takes only 1.5 weeks. However, once the initial information gathering is complete, Internet buyers spend significantly less time with their agent and preview far fewer homes, spending 2 weeks, compared to 7 weeks for the traditional buyer.

2.  Online buyers also enjoy a greater sense of control. Real estate websites of today embrace a more user-friendly attitude than ever before. The Internet helps these buyers better understand the whole home buying process, and puts them in better control of that process. They can refine their needs and wants and comparison shop to paint a more detailed picture of their dream home for you. In the end it also helps save you time, so you can steer clear of what they don’t want, and deliver on what they do.

Just know that if they’re looking for a ‘4-bedroom, 3-bathroom raised bungalow with a salt-water outdoor pool and white picket fence, close to the highway yet nestled in a quiet community and close to a nature trail’…you’ll be the first to know.

3.  Internet buyers tend to be global risk-takers. They are more willing and able to relocate now more than ever. These buyers are looking to move to different parts of the country, and use the Internet to scope out the hottest trends. They want to settle into a new lifestyle and status, not just a new home. With it they’ll earn a trend-setting label among friends and colleagues, and a life experience they’ll never forget.

Internet buyers are expanding their families at a slower pace, having children significantly later than their baby-boomer counterparts. As a REALTOR®, you need to appeal to their sense of freedom, mobile lifestyle and ability to live in an exciting new place, whether on their own or with a partner.

4.  The information they need is available at the touch of a button, anytime, anywhere. Whether they’re searching for a home on their lunch break or at 2am, they have all the resources they need on their timetable. They don’t have to play phone tag to answer their questions. Everything they need is ready and waiting for them online.

Keep in mind that Internet homebuyers want as much detailed information as possible. Therefore, real estate professionals that offer websites with specialized, inside information and detailed listings including plenty of quality photos and virtual tours, will be more likely to capture these customers.

So, who exactly are these Internet savvy homebuyers, anyway? Let’s take a closer look at the Internet homebuyer profile and how they differ from traditional buyers.

They enjoy a controlled environment.The Internet empowers this type of consumer. They have control of the search process, by way of privacy and freedom. They can regulate the level of communication they choose to have with an agent or agency, and therefore feel less pressured and more comfortable in the decision-making process.

They are usually first-time buyers.The Internet buyer tends to be new to the real estate purchasing market, and is younger, wealthier, more likely to be married and better educated than a traditional buyer.

They want to be as informed as possible. These buyers want a complete understanding of what they’ll be jumping into. Not just listings and prices, they want information on the entire real estate transaction, from agent negotiations to legal procedures. They want all the real estate marketing tools wrapped into one complete package.

Internet savvy real estate professionals are at an advantage to fill in the gaps for these types of clients. Armed with this buyer profile and the proper real estate internet marketing tool, you can learn to better recognize and understand the requirements of this market niche. Think of real estate professionals like a GPS Navigation System for the Internet homebuyer. The Internet is their road map, but they still need detailed navigated directions to get to their destination; a guide to help them through the negotiation and transaction processes of home buying.

Remember, these Internet buyers will judge your competency based on your online perception. Establishing an online presence through a user-friendly real estate website and e-mail has become a benchmark of professionalism for all business. So, if you find your business is lacking in this department, keep in mind that valuable sales are being lost each passing moment. A website can therefore only compliment your role in the home buying process. Take action and get your real estate business online. Farming, referrals, sign calls and traditional advertising can only take you so far in the 2010 marketplace.

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/internet-marketing-articles/the-internet-homebuyer-reach-them-with-a-real-estate-website-519165.html#ixzz16767RIV2
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When you purchase of home foreclosures you can be saddled with tasks you know nothing about. From securing financing, to finding the ideal property, to closing the deal and all the little steps in between, this exercise should not be undertaken without proper information and preparation.

Distressed properties are not only about great discounts, there are also a lot of risks involved. But these risks can all be minimized if not completely eliminated if you purchase home foreclosures with caution and diligence.

What You May Not Know

There are some elements that are true of all foreclosures. One is that they are all sold as is and seldom will a seller shoulder the cost of repairs for the property. There are some foreclosures that have outstanding obligations other than the mortgage. Obligations in the form of back taxes, liens and other encumbrances are not part of the seller’s disclosure. Your offer for a foreclosed home will only be considered if you can show proof that you are able to pay for your purchase. For this, you will need to obtain a loan pre-approval from your bank or any other mortgage lender. This will require the submission of some personal documents for the lender to be able to assess your financial situation and gauge your ability to borrow funds and how much.

Reducing Your Risks

Make sure you are indeed financially prepared for a high ticket investment like when you purchase home foreclosures. You should consider several listings of foreclosed properties to find the one you like. Never forgo a professional home inspection of the property as well as a title search. You should also commission an expert to conduct a comparative home value analysis in the area where your home is located. Once you have completed your research base your offer on what you have uncovered and approach the seller or his appointed agent.

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/real-estate-articles/what-to-consider-if-you-want-to-purchase-home-foreclosures-3691582.html#ixzz15q9N5wWk
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Renting vs Buying

For sure, you have been considering on purchasing your very own home. It has been quite some time now that you have been working so hard every single day and you want to see something that you would be truly proud of.

Truly, owning your own home will give this sense of pride and confidence into yourself compared to renting an apartment where you will always get stressed out as your land lord or land lady keeps on knocking on the door to ask for the rental.

Can you imagine, the amount that you are paying monthly to your land lord or land lady could have been almost the same amount which you can use to pay your own house and after you have done paying the mortgage it would be all yours?

Well to give you great view between renting and buying a house, take a look at this:

Renting:

1. It only requires 2 months advance and 1 month deposit, before you move in.

2. If you do not pay on time and be in default it does not affect your credit score, you can pay for the next days or month.

3. If you do not want to stay in that house anymore, you can go provided that you finish the duration allotted for the lease contract which is more or less about 1 year.

4. No more worries about repairs and damages, the owner will take care of it for you.

5. No matter how long you have been renting the place, it will never be yours.

Buying:

1. It requires huge sum of money before you can move in.

2. If you do not pay on time, this will affect your credit score.

3. If you do not want to stay on the house anymore, you need to sell it off and it will take couple of months or even years before someone will be interested in buying your house.

4. It would be all in to you when it comes to repairs and damages. You need to pay for all costs including labor and material.

5. After how many years of paying the monthly mortgage, when you full pay the entire amount including the principal plus the interest, it will be all yours.

If you are staying in a certain place due to work and you do not have any intent to stay there for quite longer, then renting a place would be great. However, if you want to settle down, have a family of your own, then you need to invest on real estate and buy your very own house. You do not want to rent a house for the rest of your life, right?

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/real-estate-articles/which-is-better-renting-or-buying-a-house-3688665.html#ixzz15eYhTS24
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Buying foreclosed homes has become popular amongst real estate investors and individual buyers. While these types of properties are normally priced below market value they generally require some level of repair. Those who do not carefully inspect foreclosure real estate could end up investing in a money pit.

Foreclosed homes can be purchased through public foreclosure auctions or banks. When properties are repossessed, banks first list them for sale through auction. Auction attendees submit bids and often compete against several buyers.

Individuals purchasing foreclosure real estate through auctions should have a thorough understanding of how the auction process works, as well as the foreclosure laws of the state where property is located.

Some states allow foreclosed property owners to buy their house back within 30 days after being sold through auction. This can be quite disruptive when buyers have invested money for repairs or paid off creditor judgments to clear the title. This can also slow down repair progress as buyers do not want to invest in renovation work if there is a possibility the evicted homeowner will reclaim their home.

When houses go unsold through foreclosure auction they are returned to the servicing lender. At this point they become bank owned foreclosures. Other common references include real estate owned or REO homes.

Banks negotiate with lien holders to clear creditor judgments or tax liens in order to sell the property with a clean title. Banks also engage in eviction action to remove property owners refusing to vacate the premises.

These activities cost the bank money, so REO properties are normally priced higher than foreclosures sold through auction. However, buyers can purchase the property without the burden of removing liens, judgments, evicting property owners, or worrying that the homeowner will reclaim their house.

Just as when buying any real estate; buyers should engage in due diligence. At minimum, buyers should review comparable sales reports to compare purchase prices of other homes in the area; obtain real estate appraisals to determine current market value; and home inspections to determine the types of required repairs.

Banks reduce foreclosed home prices to account for the cost of reported repairs. Banks rarely reduce the asking price of REO homes unless substantial damage is discovered during property inspections. Buyers should obtain repair costs estimates to determine the true cost of the home. If the purchase price and repair costs equate to more than the appraised value, it’s best to pass and look for a better deal.

Most banks require buyers to obtain prequalified financing prior to submitting offers on foreclosed homes. When buyers purchase foreclosure real estate through public auctions they normally must present full payment to the auction house within 24 hours upon bid acceptance.

Individuals unfamiliar with buying foreclosed homes through public auctions or banks may find working with a foreclosure specialist to be helpful. Realtors can help buyers locate the type of property they desire and assist them through the process of buying foreclosed real estate.

Buyers may also want to consult with real estate investors experienced in buying distressed properties. Numerous real estate clubs can be found via the Internet. Buyers can participate in online investment groups or locate local real estate investment groups within their hometown.

Those who take time to become educated about the process of buying foreclosure real estate can minimize financial risks, locate the best financing deals, and obtain the best price for the property.

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/real-estate-articles/foreclosed-homes-things-to-know-before-you-buy-3665853.html#ixzz15VxawlhQ
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New Home Owner

It’s not uncommon for a first time home buyer to say to me, “Gosh, just last week I called you about buying a home and now I’m in escrow! How did this happen so fast?”

The answer is it didn’t. First-time home buyers start the search long before most even realize it.

Here’s what you can expect from your home shopping experience.

Figuring Out the Benefits

You should buy a home. That’s what you’ve been hearing from friends and family, right? So, by now you have likely already weighed the benefits and decided that home ownership was the best decision for you. That’s a major hurdle now passed. You are focused and certain. Good.

Defining Search Parameters

Almost 80% of all home searches today begin on the Internet. With just a few clicks of the mouse, home buyers can search through hundreds of online listings, view virtual tours, and sort through dozens of photographs and aerial shots of neighborhoods and homes. You’ve probably defined your goals and have a pretty good idea of the type of home and neighborhood you want. By the time you reach your real estate agent’s office, you are halfway to home ownership.

How Long Should It Take to Find What You Want?

In seller’s markets, often I show only one home. After all, how many homes does one family need? A few buyers will look for years, but buyers who do that aren’t motivated. A motivated buyer will find a home within two weeks. Most of my buyers find a home within two days.

Good real estate agents will listen to your wants and needs and arrange to show only those homes that fit your particular parameters. Your agent should preview homes before showing them to you as well.

How Many Homes Will You See?

Studies show that the your memory dramatically improves after consumption of carbs and slows upon consuming sugar. So, layoff the soft drinks and have a hearty meal of carbs before venturing out to tour homes. The average number of homes that I show to a buyer in one day is seven. Any more than that, and the brain is on overload. Therefore, don’t expect to see 20 or 30 homes; although it’s physically possible to do so, you probably will not remember specific details about any of them.

The “Red Shoes” Experience

Women will relate to this. Say, you need a new pair of red shoes. You go to the mall. At the first shoe store, you find a fabulous pair of red shoes. You try them on. They fit perfectly. They are glamorous. Priced right, too. Do you buy them? Of course not! You go to every other store in the mall trying on red shoes until you are ready to drop from exhaustion. Then you return to the first store and buy those red shoes. Do not shop for a home this way. When you find the perfect home, buy it.

How to Rate Inventory

* Bring a digital camera and begin each series of photos with a close-up of the house number to identify where each group of home photos start and end.
* Take copious notes of unusual features, colors and design elements.
* Pay attention to the home’s surroundings. What is next door? Do 2-story homes tower over your single story?
* Do you like the location? Is it near a park or a power plant?
* Immediately after leaving, rate each home on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest.

View Top Choices a Second Time

After touring homes for a few days, you will probably instinctively know which one or two homes you would like to buy. Ask to see them again. You will see them with different eyes and notice elements that were overlooked the first go-around.

At this point, your agent should call the listing agents to find out more about the sellers’ motivation and to double-check that an offer hasn’t come in, making sure these homes are still available to purchase.

Making the Selection

I’ll let you in on a little secret. I generally know which home a buyer is going to choose, and I suspect most other agents operate the same way. It’s an intuition. But I make it a practice not to steer buyers, and I insist that buyers choose the home without interference from me. It’s not my choice to make.

Real estate agents are required, however, to point out defects and should help buyers feel confident that the home selected meets the buyer’s search parameters.

(ArticlesBase SC #671992)

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/mortgage-articles/first-time-home-buyer-671992.html#ixzz14cu8SD00
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Baby boomers, baby boomers, baby boomers; we all hear this term over and over again. So who are the baby boomers? Baby boomers are people in the United States who were born between 1946 and 1964. Approximately 78.2 million people fall into this category.

As a group, baby boomers comprise the largest population cohort in the history of the United States. The size of the group gives it vast influence over American politics, popular cultural, and of course, real estate. To evaluate the influence of the baby boomers on the future of real estate, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) conducted a study in 2006. The findings of the research were published in report entitled Baby Boomers and Real Estate: Today and Tomorrow. Below are some highlights from the NAR study.

AGE DISTRIBUTION

According to the NAR report, baby boomers now range in age from 42 to 60 years old. The typical baby boomer is 50 years old, and the oldest of the baby boomers turned 60 in 2006. About 46% of baby boomers are in their 40s, and about 25% are at least 55 years old.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

As a group, baby boomers are in their peak earning years. In 2005, baby boomers had a household income of $64,700, and about 25% them had a household income of at least $100,000 per year.

HOME OWNERSHIP

About 78% of baby boomers own a home, which is higher than the national ownership rate of 69%. About 96% of baby boomers believe that home ownership is a good financial investment.

FUTURE REAL ESTATE PURCHASES

About 10%, or 7.8 million of all baby boomers, said they were likely to purchase additional real estate in the next 12 months. Of these potential buyers, two-thirds were planning on buying a primary residence, 26% want to buy land, 19% want rental property, 15% want a vacation home or seasonal home, and 14% want a commercial property.

WHAT FEATURES ATTRACT BOOMERS

When baby boomers were asked about what features are most important to them, 38% wanted a lower cost of living, 38% wanted to be near family, 38% wanted easy access to quality health care, 37% wanted a better climate, and 36% wanted to be near a body of water.

PREFERRED COMMUNITY AMENITIES

When baby boomers were asked about the type of community amenities that interest them most, about 18% wanted to be near cultural offerings, 9% wanted to be closer to their family, 4% wanted to be on a golf course, and 3% wanted easy access to educational facilities.

WHERE DO BOOMERS WANT TO RETIRE

When baby boomers were asked about where they want to retire, 33% of them want to retire in a rural area, 30% in a small town, 25% in a suburban area, and only 12% in an urban community.

BOOMERS AND THEIR REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Baby boomers consistently use the services of a real estate agent. Approximately 60% of home buyers and 79% of home sellers used a real estate agent in their last transaction.

SUMMARY

The baby boomers have had and will continue to have a significant impact on the real estate market. As the boomers near retirement, they continue to value real estate and will continue to invest in properties and land. Real estate agents would be well served to understand what baby boomers want in terms of their real estate investments, and design strategies that target the needs of this enormous population cohort. For more information, read the NAR report entitled, Baby Boomers and Real Estate: Today and Tomorrow

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/real-estate-articles/baby-boomers-will-drive-real-estate-growth-87235.html#ixzz0peKzrDs6
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